Health Psychology

Clinical Evaluation and Research in Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias

Andrew Kiselica portrait

Lab director

Andrew M. Kiselica, PhD, ABPP-CN

Andrew is an assistant professor of Health Psychology and director of the Clinical Evaluation and Research in Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias (ClEaR-ADRD) lab.

Email Dr. Kiselica


Research assistant

Rylea Ranum

Rylea received her B.A. from Luther College in 2022 where she studied Neuroscience and Psychology. She is now a Research Assistant for the Clinical Evaluation and Research in Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias (ClEaR-ADRD) lab directed by Dr. Andrew Kiselica. In the future, Rylea plans to pursue a degree in Clinical Psychology with a focus in Clinical Neuropsychology.


Lab description

The primary focus of the ClEaR-ADRD lab is to develop and validate tools to detect the earliest signs of cognitive decline associated with neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s. Currently, we are also involved in collaborations to better understand the relationship between stress and cognitive aging. Furthermore, we participate in research to evaluate the ability of technologies (e.g., smartphone applications) to improve the quality of life for people with dementia and their caregivers. We collaborate with other researchers at the University of Missouri, as well as many other universities across the country. The lab welcomes MU undergraduates, recruits PhD students through our Rehabilitation Science program, and works with psychology interns and fellows through the MU Department of Health Psychology’s training programs.

Current grant funding

Research in the lab is currently supported by funding from internal awards from the University of Missouri, as well as a grant from the National Institute on Nursing Research.

Past grant funding

Dr. Kiselica has previously been the PI on a National Academy of Neuropsychology Clinical Research Grant and an Alzheimer’s Association Research Fellowship. These awards supported research to develop and validate advanced neuropsychological techniques for detecting the earliest signs of cognitive decline associated with Alzheimer’s disease.