SHP PT Student Elected to Leadership Role at National Organization

Earlier this year, SHP PT second year DPT candidate Aimee Murray was selected to serve on the board of the Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions (ASAHP)’s Student Assembly. During an organizational meeting this past May, Aimee was elected to serve as President of the assembly.

ASAHP is a not-for-profit national professional association for academic institutions and professional associations with relations to the health professions and allied health education. Deans and Associate Deans from 116 academic institutions are members of ASAHP and the organization’s primary mission is to promote and improve education in the health professions. The ASAHP Student Assembly (ASAHP-SA) was founded to bridge the gap between the members of ASAHP and the students they are serving.

In her role as President, and as a member of the Board, it will be Aimee’s responsibility to supervise all activities and operations of the organization and serve as the primary line of communication between the Student Assembly Board of Directors and the ASAHP Board of Directors. The opportunity to facilitate communication across entities was one of the aspects that persuaded Aimee to pursue the position “One major draw-in was the focus of the organization on interprofessional collaboration and building connections across Universities. For most of my graduate program,” said Aimee. “I felt that I was in a silo and unable to transcend the barriers between various health professions and between schools. Dr. Richard Oliver, (Dean Emeritus of the MU School of Health Professions) brought this opportunity to my attention and I immediately knew it was something I would be passionate about.”

Aimee sees her position at ASAHP-SA as an opportunity to educate, learn from, and connect with fellow students across health professions and to advocate for patient centered care in the profession of Physical Therapy. ” One of our goals is to accomplish chapters of this organization at various universities across the nation and to promote opportunities of network engagement and self-growth that go beyond what can be achieved in the classroom,” added Aimee. “Personally, serving on the board has already provided me the opportunity to learn from my fellow members and has challenged my critical thinking skills. I have had the opportunity to connect with students, deans, and health associations from across the nation and I can only imagine how those relationships will blossom in the upcoming year.”